THEME BY SARAHCATHS+
Teacup
believe-out-loud:

Upholding a February 2014 ruling, a federal appeals court agreed today that Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional! 

We recognize that same-sex marriage makes some people deeply uncomfortable. However, inertia and apprehension are not legitimate bases for denying same-sex couples due process and equal protection of the laws. -Judge Henry Floyd

This decision sets a precedent for the entire 4th Circuit, which also includes West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Maryland, which already has marriage equality.
Read more.

believe-out-loud:

Upholding a February 2014 ruling, a federal appeals court agreed today that Virginia’s ban on same-sex marriage is unconstitutional! 

We recognize that same-sex marriage makes some people deeply uncomfortable. However, inertia and apprehension are not legitimate bases for denying same-sex couples due process and equal protection of the laws. -Judge Henry Floyd

This decision sets a precedent for the entire 4th Circuit, which also includes West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Maryland, which already has marriage equality.

Read more.

posted 7 hours ago with 122 notes
posted 12 hours ago with 448 notes
shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

shastafirecracker:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

I knew this and this is why my mom and I have called doorways “lobotomy arches” for years

posted 17 hours ago with 26,444 notes

The Best of Grandmother Fa.

posted 17 hours ago with 23,542 notes

mrhawthorne:

Genderswap  Lena Headey as Antonia “Tony” Stark (Tony Stark/Iron Man) // requested by anonymous

You can take away my suits, you can take away my home, but there’s one thing you can never take away from me: I am Iron Woman.

Bonus: Paul Walker as Peter Potts (Pepper Potts)

posted 21 hours ago with 1,452 notes

attack-on-baritone:

theblindedlens:

slightecho:

nerdsandgamersftw:

If a wizard watched Doctor Who and the Weeping Angels became their worst fear then they came across a Boggart and it changed into an Angel, and since whatever takes the image of an Angel becomes itself an Angel, would that bring Angels into existence in the Harry Potter universe?

image

This theory is so good that there has to be fanfic about it

Please fanfic this

posted 1 day ago with 36,911 notes
Vitamin String Quartet
Thrift Shop
1,346,601 plays

The floor of Siena’s Duomo (picture from Italian Huffington Post)

The floor of Siena’s Duomo (picture from Italian Huffington Post)

posted 1 day ago with 145 notes

here is the eternal question

catch up on a show i am already watching

or start a new one

hrmrmrmrmmmmm

posted 1 day ago